Cryosols pp 415-426 | Cite as

Cryosols in the Extremely Arid Transantarctic Mountains Region of Antarctica

  • I. B. Campbell
  • G. G. C. Claridge
Chapter

Abstract

The Transantarctic Mountains are the dominant physical feature of the Antarctic continent. Some 2500 km long and up to 100 km wide, the Transantarctic Mountains form an escarpment, throughout most of their length, comprised of crystalline basement rocks, chiefly granites, overlain by Devonian to Jurassic, predominantly sandstone sediments, with massive intrusions of Jurassic dolerites (Bradshaw, 1990).

Keywords

Magnesium Sodium Chloride Sandstone Jurassic Miocene 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. B. Campbell
    • 1
  • G. G. C. Claridge
    • 2
  1. 1.Land and Soil Consultancy ServicesNelsonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Days Bay, EastbourneNew Zealand

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