Advertisement

Biomining pp 117-127 | Cite as

Biooxidation of Refractory Gold Ores (The Geobiotics Process)

  • James L. Whitlock
Part of the Biotechnology Intelligence Unit book series (BIOIU)

Abstract

Innovative biooxidation technologies may well hold the key to reduced process costs for mining in the future. Given a relatively stable gold price, mining entities must strive for continual cost reduction to remain competitive. As free-milling oxide deposits are depleted on a world-wide scale, the mining companies capable of efficiently mining and processing both low- and high-grade refractory sulfide deposits will become industry leaders. This chapter addresses a new process for the biooxidation of refractory gold ores developed by GeoBiotics, Inc.

Keywords

Concentrate Coating Pulp Density Gold Recovery Pressure Oxidation Support Rock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Brierley JA. Biooxidation heap technology for pretreatment of refractory sulfidic gold ore. In: Biomine ‘84. Adelaide, Australia: Australian Mineral Foundation, 1994.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bruynesteyn A. Biological treatment of refractory gold ores. In: Biomine ‘83. Adelaide, Australia: Australian Mineral Foundation, 1994.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lawrence RW, Poulin R. Evaluation of the potential for biotechnology in the Canadian mining industry. CANMET Report 95–029R, znd ed. 1996: 61.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bartlett RW. Aeration requirements for heap biooxidation of refractory gold ores. Olympic Valley, CA: Randol Gold Forum, April 1996: 273–276.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hansford GS, Bailey AD. Oxygen transfer limitations of biooxidation at high solids concentrations. Proceedings of International Biohydrometallurgical Symposium. Jackson WY. August 1993: 469–478.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gormely LS, Branion RMR. Engineering design of microbiological leaching reactors. Proceedings of International Biohydrometallurgical Symposium. Jackson WY. August 1989: 499–518.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ritchie AIM, Pantelis G. Optimization of oxidation rates in dump oxidation of pyrite gold ores. Proceedings of International Biohydrometallurgical Symposium. Jackson WY. 1993: 731–738.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Kohr WJ, Johansson CE, Shield JW. Improved sulfide gold ore biooxidation. In: McClelland GE, Scheiner BJ, Muhtadi O. Practical aspects of international management and processing. 1996: 48–54Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kohr WJ. Method for rendering refractory sulfide oresmore susceptible to biooxidation. U.S. Patent No. 5, 431717. 1995.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kohr WJ. Method for rendering refractory sulfide ores more susceptible to biooxidation. U.S. Patent No. 5, 573, 575. 1996.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Shield JW, Crowell RM. Heap biooxidation of sulfidic gold concentrates. Randol Gold Forum. Olympic Valley, CA. 1996: 277–280.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Shield JW, Whitlock JL, Johansson CE et al. Sulfide bioxidation pilot heap at Gilt Edge. Mining Engineering 1996; 48 (3): 48–54.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Kearns DP, Shield JW. Lowering the threshold for refractory gold deposits with new biooxidation technologies. Mine-EXPO International ‘86. Las Vegas NV. 1996.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. Whitlock

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations