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Biomining pp 45-80 | Cite as

The BIOX® Process for Biooxidation of Gold-Bearing Ores or Concentrates

  • David W. Dew
  • Ellen N. Lawson
  • Jennifer L. Broadhurst
Part of the Biotechnology Intelligence Unit book series (BIOIU)

Abstract

GENCOR S.A. Ltd. has pioneered the commercialization of biooxidation of refractory gold ores. Development of the BIOX® process started in the late 197os at GENCOR Process Research, in Johannesburg, South Africa. The early work was championed by Eric Livesey-Goldblatt, the manager of GENCOR Process Research who directed pioneering and innovative research into bacterial oxidation of refractory gold ores prior to cyanidation. This work was driven by the need to replace Fairview’s outmoded Edward’s roasters, which at the time were seriously contributing to pollution in the Barberton area.

Keywords

Sulfide Oxidation Toxicity Characteristic Leach Proce Gold Recovery Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans Gold Dissolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • David W. Dew
  • Ellen N. Lawson
  • Jennifer L. Broadhurst

There are no affiliations available

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