The Importance of Catalysis in the Chemical and Non-Chemical Industries

  • Friedrich Schmidt
Part of the Springer Series in Chemical Physics book series (CHEMICAL, volume 75)

Abstract

The chemical industry is an enabling industry. Chemicals are supplied to almost every other industry. The manufacture of goods from oil, coal or gas to everyday consumer products comprises in more or less all cases at least one catalytic step. Through its processes and products industrial catalysis contributes about one quarter to the gross domestic product of the developed countries. At the turn of the century, the value of the catalyst world market, including captive use, was estimated to be about 10 billion US$ with ¼ refining, ¼ polymers, ¼ chemicals and ¼ environment. The goods and services created from petrochemistry, refining and polymerization catalysis on average were estimated to be about 200 to 300 times the value of the catalyst.

Catalysis is truly multidisciplinary with respect to various areas: inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, bio-chemistry, chemical engineering, bio-engineering, materials science, surface science, kinetics, and theoretical chemistry.

Keywords

Benzene Steam Catalysis Hydrocarbon Propylene 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Friedrich Schmidt
    • 1
  1. 1.RosenheimGermany

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