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Multi-Agent Negotiation Models for Power System Applications

  • James D. McCalley
  • Zhong Zhang
  • Vijayanand Vishwanathan
  • Vasant Honavar
Chapter
Part of the Power Systems book series (POWSYS)

Abstract

Motivated by the need to coordinate decisions among competing power system stakeholders, we describe multi-agent negotiation systems to perform negotiated decision-making. The negotiation theory is reviewed. Two multi-agent negotiation models are described. A multi-agent negotiation system is implemented and some illustrative power industry applications are presented.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • James D. McCalley
    • 1
  • Zhong Zhang
    • 1
  • Vijayanand Vishwanathan
    • 1
  • Vasant Honavar
    • 1
  1. 1.Iowa State UniversityUSA

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