Transcriptome Profile and Cluster Analysis of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae under Hydrostatic Pressure Conditions

  • Takayuki Homma
  • Yuko Momose
  • Emi Ishidou
  • Mine Odani
  • Hisayo Shimizu
  • Syuichi Oka
  • Hitoshi Iwahashi
Conference paper

Abstract

Several lines of evidence suggest that hydrostatic pressure affects the physiological activities of living cells, for example, growth rate, viability, membrane and protein structure. However, mechanisms underlying the effects of hydrostatic pressure have not been clarified in cellular systems. In this study, we applied cluster analysis to evaluate genome-wide expression profiles after pressure treatment. The effect of 6 different pressure treatments and 23 different stress conditions were analysed by cluster analysis. Transcriptome profiles for hydrostatic pressure treatments were found to be grouped together on a contiguous branch of a dendrogram. The present results suggest that genome-wide expressions after hydrostatic pressure treatment were similar to those after temperature and detergent stress treatment.

Keywords

Fermentation DMSO Cadmium CdCl Dodecyl 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takayuki Homma
    • 1
  • Yuko Momose
    • 2
  • Emi Ishidou
    • 2
  • Mine Odani
    • 1
  • Hisayo Shimizu
    • 1
  • Syuichi Oka
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Iwahashi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.International Patent Organism DepositaryNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)Japan
  2. 2.Research Institute of Biological ResourcesAIST AIST Tsukuba Central 6Tsukuba, IbarakiJapan

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