Historical Review

  • Debra J. Searles
  • Ellak I. von Nagy-Felsobuki
Part of the Lecture Notes in Chemistry book series (LNC, volume 61)

Abstract

Spectroscopy can be defined as the quantitative study of radiation by dispersing its component frequencies and attributing a relative intensity to each. It is generally applied to the investigation of the behaviour of light when interacting with matter. The technique gives precise information on the atomic and molecular source of incoming and/or outgoing radiation, thereby probing the structure of matter (which make its presence known by resonant or non-processes). Since the mid 19th century it has become indispensable in structure determination and in chemical analysis.

Keywords

Microwave Manifold Selene Sine Cose 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Debra J. Searles
    • 1
  • Ellak I. von Nagy-Felsobuki
    • 2
  1. 1.Research School of ChemistryAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryThe University of NewcastleCallaghanAustralia

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