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Introduction

  • Terence N. Mitchell
  • Burkhard Costisella

Abstract

NMR spectroscopy is arguably the most important analytical method available today. The reasons are manifold: it is applied by chemists and physicists to gases, liquids, liquid crystals and solids (including polymers). Biochemists use it routinely for determining the structures of peptides and proteins, and it is also widely used in medicine (where it is often called MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging). With the advent of spectrometers operating at very high magnetic fields (up to 21.1 T, i.e. 900 MHz proton resonance frequency) it has become an extremely sensitive technique, so that it is now standard practice to couple NMR with high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The wide range of nuclei which are magnetically active makes NMR attractive not only to the organic chemist but also to the organometallic and inorganic chemist. The latter in particular often has the choice between working with liquid or solid samples; the combination of high resolution and magic angle spinning (HR/MAS) of solid samples provides a wealth of structural information which is complementary to that obtained by X-ray crystallography. The same suite of techniques, slightly adapted, is now available to those working in the field of combinatorial chemistry. This is only a selection of the possibilities afforded by NMR, and the list of methods and applications continues to multiply.

Keywords

Liquid Crystal Resonance Frequency Organic Structure Solid Sample High Pressure Liquid Chromatography 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terence N. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Burkhard Costisella
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachbereich ChemieUniversität DortmundDortmundGermany

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