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Alternative Therapy: Vitamin Use in the Elderly

  • J. E. Thurman
  • A. D. Mooradian
Chapter

Abstract

In the next 30 to 40 years, the population of adults over the age of 65 years of age is estimated to double [1]. As the population of the United States ages, there is a concurrent need to address the morbidity associated with ageing. Rudman et al. [2], examined a population of nursing home residents and found that nearly 70% of the residents had a reduced body mass index (BMI), a 50% incidence of anemia, and a majority had a serum albumin 003C3.5 g/dl. They also found that all of the study group had a dietary intake 003C50% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of several essential nutrients including: zinc, magnesium, manganese, copper, vitamin E retinol, nicotinic acid, pyridoxine, and folic acid. With this in mind, it is important to consider that institutionalized elderly may be deficient in their dietary intake of several essential vitamins. This dietary deficiency may lead to further health complications.

Keywords

Ascorbic Acid Folic Acid Nicotinic Acid Nursing Home Resident Recommended Dietary Allowance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. E. Thurman
  • A. D. Mooradian

There are no affiliations available

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