Legal and Policy Aspects

  • Ruth Chadwick
  • S. Henson
  • B. Moseley
  • G. Koenen
  • M. Liakopoulos
  • C. Midden
  • A. Palou
  • G. Rechkemmer
  • D. Schröder
  • A. von Wright
Chapter
Part of the Wissenschaftsethik und Technikfolgenbeurteilung book series (ETHICSSCI, volume 20)

Abstract

Functional foods do not have a specific place in food law; consequently there is a great deal of confusion about what they are, could or should be. A common perception is that functional foods are foodstuffs either with one or more specific added ingredients (components), or certain substances of common ingredients (components) removed and which are claimed to have a positive influence on human health or well-being. The term ‘functional foods’ for this group of products is considered to be an unfortunate one since all foodstuffs are or should be functional and a more appropriate term might be helpful. In this chapter a description developed in The Netherlands in 2000 is introduced viz. specific health promoting foods (SHPF).

Keywords

Cholesterol Obesity Starch Corn Europe 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Chadwick
    • 1
  • S. Henson
  • B. Moseley
  • G. Koenen
  • M. Liakopoulos
  • C. Midden
  • A. Palou
  • G. Rechkemmer
  • D. Schröder
  • A. von Wright
  1. 1.ESCR Center for the Economic and Social Aspects Furnes CollegeLancaster UniversityLancasterUK

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