Walking Robots

  • Thomas Bräunl

Abstract

Walking robots are an important alternative to driving robots, since the majority of the world’s land area is unpaved. Although driving robots are more specialized and better adapted to flat surfaces — they can drive faster and navigate with higher precision — walking robots can be employed in more general environments. Walking robots follow nature by being able to navigate rough terrain, or even climb stairs or over obstacles in a standard household situation, which would rule out most driving robots.

Keywords

Torque Hull Nism Sonar 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Bräunl
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer EngineeringThe University of Western AustraliaCrawley, PerthAustralia

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