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Biochips pp 51-59 | Cite as

DNA Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

  • Y. Li
  • J. L. Dai
  • Y. Xie
  • Y. M. Mao
  • M. Y. Qiu
  • X. Q. Cao
  • W. Fu
  • K. Ying
  • H. Xu
  • S. D. Huang
Part of the Biological and Medical Physics Series book series (BIOMEDICAL)

Abstract

Differential gene expression profiles between normal tissue and Hepatocellular Carcinoma using DNA microarray are described. DNA microarrays were prepared by spotting PCR products of 4096 human genes onto specially treated glass slides. The cDNA probes were prepared by labeling normal tissue mRNA and cancer tissue mRNA with Cy3-dUTP and Cy5-dUTP separately through reverse transcription. The arrays were then hybridized against the cDNA probe mixture and the fluorescent signals were scanned. The data obtained from repeated experiments were analyzed. Around 1000 genes exhibit differentially expression profiles in hepatocellular carcinomas from several specimens, some of which have been proved to involve hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Northern blot was used to verify the array hybridization data. Some unreported genes are undergoing further research concerning their function. This technology provides a powerful method to elucidate tumor-specific gene expression profiles in human cancer.

Keywords

Hepatocellular Carcinoma Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis PTPase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Li
  • J. L. Dai
  • Y. Xie
  • Y. M. Mao
  • M. Y. Qiu
  • X. Q. Cao
  • W. Fu
  • K. Ying
  • H. Xu
  • S. D. Huang

There are no affiliations available

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