Tumors and Tumor-Like Lesions

  • S. Peer
  • G. Bodner
Part of the Medical Radiology Diagnostic Imaging book series (MEDRAD)

Abstract

Peripheral nerve tumors are uncommon and their clinical signs and symptoms often nonspecific, which is why they may pose a diagnostic problem (this is particularly true for the neck, where a palpable mass is often mistaken for an enlarged lymph node by the referring clinician). Several neurogenic tumors can affect the musculoskeletal system, including traumatic neuroma, Morton’s neuroma, neural fibrolipoma, nerve sheath ganglia, neurilemmoma, neurofibroma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (Murphey et al. 1999). In general the diagnosis of such a lesion is based on the detection of a mass in association with neurological signs. It is important, however, to differentiate musculoskeletal lesions with secondary nerve involvement from lesions directly derived from neurogenic tissue. In this regard imaging may be helpful, but only if the applied method has the potential to establish the diagnosis by demonstration of a lesion in direct continuity with a peripheral nerve (Fig. 5.1).

Keywords

Burning Phenol Sarcoma Peri Triad 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Peer
    • 1
  • G. Bodner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Section for Diagnostic and Interventional SonographyUniversity Hospital InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria

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