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The Glass Transition

  • Pierre Papon
  • Jacques Leblond
  • Paul H. E. Meijer
Part of the Advanced Texts in Physics book series (ADTP)

Abstract

Most solid mineral compounds and elements form liquids of low viscosity (several centipoises) when they melt, and when the temperature is reduced, they solidify again to form a crystalline solid. Alternatively, there are materials which become liquids with a very high viscosity (105–107 P) when melted. When they are cooled below their melting point, these liquids do not solidify instantaneously but remain in a supercooled state, the viscosity of the liquid increases significantly when the temperature is reduced, and they then “freeze” in the form of a glass, which is a noncrystalline solid state. We say that the liquid has undergone a glass transition and that a glassy or vitreous state has formed.

Keywords

Glass Transition Glass Transition Temperature Supercooled Liquid Mode Coupling Theory Supercooled State 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pierre Papon
    • 1
  • Jacques Leblond
    • 1
  • Paul H. E. Meijer
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Physique ThermiqueÉcole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de Paris (ESPCI)ParisFrance
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsCatholic University of AmericaUSA

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