Industry Cluster Analysis

  • Robert J. Stimson
  • Roger R. Stough
  • Brian H. Roberts
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

Early chapters in this book discussed how, during the three decades that followed the end of World War II, national governments of all persuasion had embarked upon programs to develop national industries to create employment and to achieve greater self-sufficiency in the production of domestic goods and services. Large heavy industry and assembly towns emerged under national industry plans. Many of those industries had strong horizontal and vertically integrated systems of production orientated to the manufacture of total or fully assembled products. Interaction between industry sectors was limited, and there was significant duplication of research, service provision and resource consumption. National industries were also protected by tariffs and monopoly provisions, leading to inefficiencies, reduced competitiveness and declining innovation. By the 1980s, national restructuring policies, globalization and new production technology began challenging traditional production systems leading to emerging global corporations looking at ways to improve efficiencies and competitiveness.

Keywords

Europe Transportation Income Marketing Agglomeration 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Stimson
    • 1
  • Roger R. Stough
    • 2
  • Brian H. Roberts
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Research into Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures, School of Geography, Planning and ArchitectureThe University of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia
  2. 2.School of Public PolicyGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  3. 3.Center for Developing CitiesUniversity of CanberraCanberraAustralia

Personalised recommendations