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Analysis of Volatile Components of Citrus Fruit Essential Oils

  • G. Ruberto
Chapter
Part of the Molecular Methods of Plant Analysis book series (MOLMETHPLANT, volume 21)

Abstract

The geographical origin of Citrus fruits is localised in a large region of Southeast Asia comprising southern China, India, Indo-China, Indonesia and the Malay Archipelago. Very slowly, and thanks mainly to nomads, merchants, conquest wars and explorers, Citrus fruits became known in Africa and Europe. Several witnesses to the presence of Citrus fruits during Alexander the Great’s reign and the Greek and Roman periods may be found in literature, sculptures, mosaics and so on. However, it was under Arab rule throughout most of the Mediterranean basin, in a long period between the end of the first and the beginning of the second millennium, that the diffusion as well as the first cultivation of Citrus plants occurred (Webber 1967). Indeed, in this period an Arab botanist, Al-Beithâr, reported, in his treatise “Dictionary of the Simple Remedies” (1200), the first technical description of essential oil extraction from citron fruits (Calabrese 1990). However, for many centuries the cultivation of Citrus plants was limited to their ornamental use. Their industrial exploitation started in Sicily between 1500 and 1600 precisely with the extraction of essential oil from lemon fruits. The process entailed the removal of the peel from the pulp, which was considered a waste product, and only successively was the pulp used industrially to prepare the juice, called “agro”, exclusively for the preparation of calcium citrate (Safina 1984).

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Versus Versus Versus Citrus Fruit Versus Versus Versus Versus Versus Versus Versus Versus Versus 
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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Ruberto
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto del C.N.R. per lo Studio delle Sostanze Naturali di Interesse Alimentare e Chimico-FarmaceuticoValverde, CTItaly

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