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Abstract

Canada has a very solid and positive reputation in international circles regarding its record on environmental protection. In many ways this reputation is generally warranted. In particular, many individual Canadians have played an important role in advancing the capacity for environmental protection, especially at the international level. Maurice Strong chaired both the Stockholm and Rio conferences and Jim MacNeill was a principle figure within the World Commission on Environment and Development and in developing the seminal publication: Our Common Future. Elizabeth Dowdeswell is the current head of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP). Moreover, one of the most important international NGOs, Greenpeace, had its origins in Canada, and one of the most important and successful international environmental treaties, the Montréal Protocol (on ozone depleting substances) was signed in Canada. Clearly, Canada and Canadians have earned a positive international image on the environmental front. However, there are recent signs that Canada’s environmental capacities, while still comparatively strong, are suffering an important decline as governments in Canada have downsized their public service and cut heavily into spending levels in all areas of expenditure, including environmental protection.

Keywords

Federal Government Great Lake Acid Rain North American Free Trade Agree Environmental Movement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert C. Paehlke

There are no affiliations available

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