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Abstract

Hungary faces a range of significant threats to its environment related to its geographical position in the heart of Europe, the legacy of over 40 years of resource-intensive command economy and the challenges of renewed growth in the current phase of consolidation.

Keywords

European Union Environmental Policy Public Participation Environmental Impact Assessment European Environment Agency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joanne Caddy
  • Anna Vári

There are no affiliations available

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