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Will the New EU Regional Policy Meet the Challenges of Enlargement?

  • Gabriele Tondl
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

The European Union has established an important tool to solve its cohesion problem, given by the substantial disparities in economic development between its members, with EU regional policy. This policy concentrated its support on the lagging regions of the Union, the cohesion countries, Spain, Ireland, Portugal and Greece, and other objective 1 regions such as Southern Italy and East Germany. But EU policy support is also an important tool to solve regional problems in the richer EU members under the objective 2 policy.

Keywords

Regional Policy Eastern Country Structural Fund Investment Incentive Candidate Country 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabriele Tondl
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Economics & B.A. Institute for European AffairsViennaAustria

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