Status, Problems and Integrated Management of Baltic Coastal Ecosystems

  • Gerald Schernewski
  • Ulrich Schiewer
Part of the Central and Eastern European Development Studies book series (CEEDES)

Abstract

The Baltic coastal region is under intensive anthropogenic pressure and is expected to become a major centre for economic growth and prosperity in Europe during this century. Trade, municipalities, industry, traffic, energy generation, shipping, agriculture and fisheries, tourism, nature protection and raw material exploitation all cause a complicated patchwork of interacting and overlapping uses. In rural areas, nature conservation, tourism and coastal protection are most important. Information about terrestrial regions can be regarded as sufficient, but the state of and problems in coastal waters need to receive increased attention. Two major ecological problems are the intrusion of alien species, which arrive in the ballast water of ships, and the ongoing eutrophication. In the future, the pressure on the Baltic coastal zones will increase, and strategies for a joint sustainable development as well as Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) are urgently needed. On the basis of results obtained as part of the workshop `Baltic Coastal Ecosystems — Structure, Function and Coastal Zone Management’, that took place in Rostock, Germany, in November 2000, the state of ICZM in Germany and the Baltic region is discussed, and shortcomings are outlined.

Keywords

Phosphorus Europe Foam Petroleum Shipping 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Schernewski
    • 1
  • Ulrich Schiewer
    • 2
  1. 1.Baltic Sea Research Institute (IOW)Rostock-WarnemündeGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Aquatic EcologyUniversity of RostockRostockGermany

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