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Chronocoulometry

  • György Inzelt

Abstract

In 1834 Faraday suggested two fundamental laws of electrolysis. According to Faraday the amount of material deposited or evolved (m) during electrolysis is directly proportional to the current (I) and the time (t), i. e., on the quantity of electricity (Q) that passes through the solution (first law). The amount of the product depends on the equivalent mass of the substance electrolyzed (second law). (In fact, Faraday’s laws are based on two fundamental laws, i. e., on the conservation of matter and the conservation of charge.)

Keywords

Potential Step Pulse Technique Electroanalytical Chemistry Cottrell Equation Double Potential Step 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • György Inzelt

There are no affiliations available

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