Advertisement

Thermodynamics of Electrochemical Reactions

  • Fritz Scholz

Abstract

The wish to determine thermodynamic data of electrochemical reactions and of the involved compounds is one of the most important motivations to perform electrochemical measurements. After calorimetry, electrochemistry is the second most important source of chemical thermodynamics. Although ab initio quantum chemical calculations can be used for the calculation of thermodynamic data of small molecules, the day is not yet foreseeable when electrochemical experiments will be replaced by such calculations. In this chapter we will provide the essential information as to what thermodynamic information can be extracted from electrochemical experiments, and what are the necessary prereauisites to do so.

Keywords

Cyclic Voltammetry Electrochemical Reaction Formal Potential Differential Pulse Voltammetry Standard Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1. (a)
    Rieger PH (1987) Electrochemistry. Prentice-Hall Int., LondonGoogle Scholar
  2. 1. (b)
    Hamann CH, Hamnett A, Vielstich W (1998) Electrochemistry. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Singapore, TorontoGoogle Scholar
  3. 2. (a)
    Bard AJ, Parsons R, Jordan J (eds) (1985) Standard potentials in aqueous solution. Marcel Dekker, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. 2. (b)
    Pourbaix M (1966) Atlas of electrochemical equilibria in aqueous solutions. Pergamon Press, Elmsford, NYGoogle Scholar
  5. 2. (c)
    Kotrlý S, Sůcha L (1985) Handbook of chemical equilibria in analytical chemistry. Ellis Horwood Ltd., ChichesterGoogle Scholar
  6. 3.
    Galus Z (1994) Fundamentals of electrochemical analysis, 2nd edn. Ellis Horwood, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo, Singapore, Polish Scientific Publishers PWN, Warsaw, p 278Google Scholar
  7. 4.
    Galus Z (1994) Fundamentals of electrochemical analysis, 2nd edn. Ellis Horwood, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo, Singapore, Polish Scientific Publishers PWN Warsaw, p 281Google Scholar
  8. 5.
    Heyrovský M, Vavricka S (1972) J Electroanal Chem 36: 203CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 6.
    Heyrovský J, Kuta J (1965) Grundlagen der Polarographie. Akademie-Verlag, Berlin, p 124Google Scholar
  10. 7.
    Galus Z (1994) Fundamentals of electrochemical analysis, 2nd edn. Ellis Horwood, New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, Tokyo, Singapore, Polish Scientific Publishers PWN, Warsaw, p 282Google Scholar
  11. 8.
    Scholz F, Komorsky-Lovrić Š, Lovrić M (2000) Electrochem Commun 2: 112CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 9.
    Koryta J, Vanýsek P (1981) Electrochemical phenomena at the interface of two immiscible electrolyte solutions. In: Gerischer H, Tobias ChW (eds) Advances in electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering, vol 12. John Wiley, New York, p 113Google Scholar
  13. 10.
    Girault HH, Schiffrin DJ (1989) Electrochemistry of liquid-liquid interfaces. In: Bard AJ (ed) Electroanalytical chemistry, vol. 15. Marcel Dekker, New York, p 1Google Scholar
  14. 11.
    Vantsek P (1996) Liquid-liquid electrochemistry. In: Vanysek (ed) Modern techniques in electroanalysis. John Wiley, New York, p 346Google Scholar
  15. 12.
    http://dcwww.epfl.ch/cgi-bin/LE/DB/InterrDB.plGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fritz Scholz

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations