Acoustic Borehole Imaging

  • Stefan M. Luthi
Chapter

Abstract

The “borehole televiewer” (BHTV) developed by Mobil in the late 1960s was the first borehole imaging device that could be run in typical wells of the oil industry (Zemanek et al., 1969, 1970). Optical imaging devices (chapter 2.5) had been developed earlier but were only applicable in holes with clear visibility, i.e. containing either clear water or air. Additionally, they only recorded stationary images, while the borehole televiewer allowed a continuous recording along the borehole wall. The borehole televiewer operated as an ultrasonic reflection scanner of the borehole wall, and its early images showed interesting features on the borehole wall such as fractures, breakouts and major lithological contacts, and in cased hole perforations as well as casing joints. Subsequent development of this measurement technique had been undertaken by Amoco (Wiley, 1980; Broding, 1981), Shell (Rambow, 1984) and Arco (Pasternak & Goodwill, 1983). Today all major oil service companies offer an ultrasonic borehole imaging measurement (table 2.3.1). They all operate in reflection mode although experiments with refraction measurements were also made but no commercial service resulted from this. Most elements of the original borehole televiewer are still found in these newer tools, but the term “televiewer” has been replaced by “ultrasonic imaging” and “scanning” (Faraguna et al., 1989; Hayman et al., 1998).

Keywords

Attenuation Sandstone Shale Drilling Petrol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan M. Luthi
    • 1
  1. 1.Delft University of TechnologyDelftThe Netherlands

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