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Discrete Choice Modelling: Basic Principles and Application to Parking Policy Assessment

  • Harmen Oppewal
  • Harry Timmermans
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

The prediction of the spatial distribution of consumer demand constitutes an important step in the planning and strategic decision making processes of businesses and government alike. For example, the planning of service facilities is largely determined by how many facilities are required as a function of population growth or other indicators of demand. Similarly, when entering new spatial markets, businesses will assess the market potential as reflected by the potential demand in the market and the strength and position of their competitors. Hence, information concerning spatial demand allows businesses and governments to assess their plans in terms of indicators such as market shares, turnover, and feasibility.

Keywords

Discrete Choice Transport Mode Choice Probability Shopping Centre Discrete Choice Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harmen Oppewal
  • Harry Timmermans

There are no affiliations available

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