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Crime Pattern Analysis, Spatial Targeting and GIS: The Development of New Approaches for use in Evaluating Community Safety Initiatives

  • Alex Hirschfield
  • David Yarwood
  • Kate Bowers
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

A Geographical Information System is a system of hardware, software and procedures designed to support the capture, management, manipulation, analysis, modelling and display of spatially referenced information. Such systems enable links to be established and relationships to be analysed between different phenomena by cross referencing data sets drawn from a range of sources (e.g., data on demography, infrastructure, land use, environmental quality, health, crime and disorder, social cohesion, etc).

Keywords

Crime Rate Crime Prevention High Crime Repeat Victimisation Modifiable Areal Unit Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Hirschfield
  • David Yarwood
  • Kate Bowers

There are no affiliations available

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