Advertisement

Boundary-Swapping Optimisation and Region Design

  • Bill Macmillan
Part of the Advances in Spatial Science book series (ADVSPATIAL)

Abstract

The project described in this chapter, which was conducted in the mid 1990s, had some unusual characteristics. From a regional science perspective, it lay outside the core area of spatial economics. Analytically, it had as much to do with algorithms as models. Procedurally, it was more concerned with education than model implementation. And for the client, its value was as much institutional as technical. The project was conducted for a national Electoral Agency. It was part of a redistricting exercise on the boundaries for national elections. The country, which for reasons of client confidentiality must remain nameless, was regarded as having suffered in the past from widespread gerrymandering and the Electoral Agency was responsible for preparing a new, defensible, electoral map. The larger part of this exercise, in terms of labour and computing time, involved the production of a spatial database containing digitised boundaries and statistical information for census tracts. The particular element with which we1 were concerned was the assembly of census tracts into constituencies. We were not asked to set up and run a procedure for generating constituencies but to advise on the scope for, and difficulties inherent in, the use of so-called active redistricting methods. In particular, we focussed on the use of boundary-swapping optimisation methods in a geographical information system (GIS) environment (for more details on GIS see chapters 15–17).

Keywords

Geographical Information System Census Tract Region Design Geographical Information System Environment Fair Representation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bowdry M. (1990) Simulated annealing — an improved computer model for political redistricting, Yale Law and Policy Review, 8, 163–179.Google Scholar
  2. Butler D. and McLean I. (1996) The redrawing of parliamentary boundaries in Britain. In I. McLean and D. Butler (Eds.) Fixing the Boundaries: Defining and Redefining Single-Member Electoral districts, Dartmouth, Aldershot, pp 1–38.Google Scholar
  3. Economist, The (1992) Congressional redistricting: no grey areas. 8 February 1992, pp. 48–49.Google Scholar
  4. Macmillan W. (1999), Optimal zone design: SARA 1 (forthcoming).Google Scholar
  5. Macmillan W. and Pierce T. (1996) Active computer-assisted redistricting. In McLean I. and Butler D. (Eds.) Fixing the Boundaries: Defining and Redefining Single-Member Electoral districts, Dartmouth, Aldershot, pp 219–234.Google Scholar
  6. Macmillan W. and Pierce T. (1994) Optmization modelling in a GIS framework: the problem of political redistricting. In Fotheringham S. and Rogerson P. (Eds.) Spatial Analysis and GIS, Taylor and Francis, London, pp 221–46.Google Scholar
  7. McLean I. and Butler D. (Eds.) (1996) Fixing the Boundaries: Defining and Redefining Single-Member Electoral districts, Dartmouth, Aldershot, pp 1–38.Google Scholar
  8. Openshaw S. and Rao L. (1995) Algorithms for reengineering 1991 Census geography. Environment and Planning A 27, pp 425–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bill Macmillan

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations