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Robust Localization in Reverberant Rooms

  • Joseph H. DiBiase
  • Harvey F. Silverman
  • Michael S. Brandstein
Part of the Digital Signal Processing book series (DIGSIGNAL)

Abstract

Talker localization with microphone arrays has received significant attention lately as a means for the automated tracking of individuals in an enclosure and as a necessary component of any general purpose speech capture system. Several algorithmic approaches are available for speech source localization with multi-channel data. This chapter summarizes the current field and comments on the general merits and shortcomings of each genre. A new localization method is then presented in detail. By utilizing key features of existing methods, this new algorithm is shown to be significantly more robust to acoustical conditions, particularly reverberation effects, than the traditional localization techniques in use today.

Keywords

Microphone Array Microphone Signal Room Impulse Response Robust Localization Reverberant Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph H. DiBiase
    • 1
  • Harvey F. Silverman
    • 1
  • Michael S. Brandstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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