Intellectual Capital

  • Peter Heisig
  • Jens Vorbeck
  • Johannes Niebuhr

Abstract

Finance and economic circles have been aware of the fact for some time that the value of a firm rests on something more than just its financial and material capital. The so-called intangible or invisible assets of a company, such as know-how, the creativity of employees, and mature relations with customers influence its value enormously. In the last few years, economic enterprises have discovered these factors for themselves in addition to knowledge and knowledge management.104 In a survey conducted in 1999, 82.3% of the 1,300 firms questioned from various branches in Europe, North America, and Asia named intellectual capital as a critical factor for their future business success.105

Keywords

Europe Income Radar Marketing OECD 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Heisig
  • Jens Vorbeck
  • Johannes Niebuhr

There are no affiliations available

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