Rehabilitation of the Foot Following Sports-Related Injuries and Surgical Treatment

  • Andrea Scala

Abstract

The foot is a complex anatomical entity subdivided into several bones and different articular modules, each providing distinct biomechanical patterns. These modular structures can change their spatial orientation instantly, thus adapting to the different functional requirements of the inferior limb. The foot is then able to provide both stability and flexibility.

Keywords

Fatigue Torque Corticosteroid Immobilization Sponge 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Scala

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