Summary

  • Rainer Friedrich
  • Peter Bickel
Chapter

Abstract

Transport is an important source of emissions of many pollutants to the air, e.g. nitrogen oxides, fine particles, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, various volatile organic compounds and others. The emissions of these substances cause considerable damage affecting a wide range of receptors including human health, flora and fauna and materials. These damages are in general not adequately reflected in the transport prices; as long as third parties and not the transport user himself is effected, they represent external effects. If such effects exist but are not adequately considered, when making decisions — for example about the number and destinations of trips, the choice of the transport mode, or investments in infrastructure — a non-optimal allocation of resources leading to welfare losses may occur. Hence, external effects should be taken into account when making decisions. This makes it necessary to quantify and monetise the external effects

Keywords

Zinc Sugar Combustion Methane Dioxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rainer Friedrich
    • 1
  • Peter Bickel
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of Energy (IER)University of StuttgartStuttgartGermany

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