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Techniques

  • Susan S. Adler
  • Dominiek Beckers
  • Math Buck
Chapter

Abstract

The goal of the PNF techniques is to promote functional movement through facilitation, inhibition, strengthening, and relaxation of muscle groups. The techniques use concentric, eccentric, and static muscle contractions. These muscle contractions with properly graded resistance and suitable facilitatory procedures are combined and adjusted to fit the needs of each patient.

Keywords

Isometric Contraction Eccentric Contraction Passive Range Trunk Flexion Antagonistic Muscle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Kabat H (1950) Studies on neuromuscular dysfunction, XII: Rhythmic stabilization; a new and more effective technique for treatment of paralysis through a cerebellar mechanism. Perm Found Med Bull 8: 9–19Google Scholar
  2. Knott M, Voss DE (1956) Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation: patterns and techniques. Harper and Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Knott M, Voss DE (1968) Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation: patterns and techniques. 2nd edn. Harper and Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Sullivan PE, Markos PD, Minor MAD (1982) An integrated approach to therapeutic exercise. Reston, VirginiaGoogle Scholar
  5. Voss DE, Ionta M, Myer BT (1985) Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, patterns and techniques. 3rd edn. Harper and Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Markos PD (1979) Ipsilateral and contralateral effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques on hip motion and electro-myographic activity. Phys Ther 59 (11): 1366–1373PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Moore M, Kukulkan C (1988) Depression of H reflexes following voluntary contraction. Phys Ther 68:862Google Scholar
  3. Rose-Jacobs R, Gilberti N (1984) Effect of PNF and Rood relaxation techniques on muscle length. Phys Ther 64:725Google Scholar
  4. Sady SP, Wortman M, Blanke D (1982) Flexibility training: ballistic, static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation? Arch Phys Med Rehabil 63:261–263PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Tanigawa MC (1972) Comparison of the hold-relax procedure and passive mobilization on increasing muscle length. Phys Ther 52:725–735PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan S. Adler
    • 1
  • Dominiek Beckers
    • 2
  • Math Buck
    • 2
  1. 1.ChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Rehabilitation Centre HoensbroekHoensbroekNetherlands

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