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Bone Diseases pp 471-487 | Cite as

Parosteal and Extraskeletal Lesions

  • Claus-Peter Adler

Abstract

The individual bones of the skeleton stand in close functional relationship to the surrounding soft tissues. Even from the descriptive point of view, both are differentiated from mesenchymal tissue, so that the influence of one upon the other is mutual, and, from the structural point of view, they are very similar tissues. Topographically the bones are in close contact with the surrounding soft parts. Even with the periosteum, which is regarded as being part of the bone, the transition from bone to soft tissue has already begun. Pathological processes which develop primarily in the periosteum (for instance, periostitis ossificans, p. 160; the periosteal chondrosarcoma, p. 252; the parosteal osteosarcoma, p. 288) usually initiate a reaction both in the bone as well as in the adjacent soft tissues, where they may be identified and analyzed radiologically.

Keywords

Giant Cell Tumor Soft Part Tendon Sheath Wrist Joint Myositis Ossificans 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claus-Peter Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.Pathologisches Institut Ludwig-Aschoff-Haus, Referenzzentrum für KnochenkrankheitenUniversität FreiburgFreiburgGermany

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