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Regional and Global Stratigraphic Cycles

  • Andrew D. Miall
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Abstract

The development of the science of planetary geology, our increasing familiarity with views of the earth taken from satellites and from outer space, and the increasing sophistication of geophysical techniques for exploring the earth’s interior have all encouraged scientists to adopt a planetary perspective on questions of global history and current problems of biological, climatic, and geologic change (Anderson 1984; Maxwell 1984). From this has evolved the “Gaia” concept and the earth-systems-science approach to the study of our planet (Skinner and Porter 1995). Early sequence studies evolved from the model of global eustasy, in which it was hypothesized that sequence stratigraphies around the world were controlled primarily by global changes in sea level (Vail et al 1977). If this is indeed the case, it permits us to build a global stratigraphic template for correlation based on regional stratigraphic successions.

Keywords

Continental Margin Sequence Boundary Sediment Supply Foreland Basin Petroleum Geology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew D. Miall
    • 1
  1. 1.Geology DepartmentUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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