Tectonism and Sedimentation: Principles and Models

  • Andrew D. Miall
Chapter

Abstract

There are three crustal stress environments in which sedimentary basins are created (Fig. 7.1): extensional basins, in which the axis of maximum stress is vertical, and contractional and shear basins, in which this axis is horizontal. The various plate-tectonic settings in which these configurations occur are discussed in Chapter 9.

Keywords

Petroleum Sandstone Trench Mudstone Burial 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew D. Miall
    • 1
  1. 1.Geology DepartmentUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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