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Sequence Stratigraphy

  • Andrew D. Miall
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Abstract

Sequence stratigraphy developed initially as a tool for stratigraphic correlation (Sloss et al. 1949; Sloss 1963). The sequence-stratigraphic approach to basin analysis became widely used after Peter Vail and his Exxon colleagues demonstrated that sequences could be defined and correlated by the use of reflection-seismic data. Since the ground-breaking publication by Vail et al. (1977), sequence stratigraphy has evolved into one of the central, theoretical underpinnings of the science of stratigraphy. It comprises a set of predictions that can be made about the facies and architecture of sediments formed in a particular range of environments under specified allogenic controls. It is the predictability of sequences that give them their value for regional correlation and for one of the main practical applications of such correlation — petroleum exploration. Sequence stratigraphy represents a relatively new paradigm in geology. The development of this paradigm has completely revolutionized stratigraphy since the 1980s. The principal hypothesis is that stratigraphic successions maybe subdivided into discrete sequences bounded by widespread unconformities. There are two parts to the hypothesis.

Keywords

System Tract Sequence Boundary Sequence Stratigraphy Sediment Supply Highstand System Tract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew D. Miall
    • 1
  1. 1.Geology DepartmentUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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