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Facies Analysis

  • Andrew D. Miall
Chapter

Abstract

The study and interpretation of the textures, sedimentary structures, fossils, and lithologic associations of sedimentary rocks on the scale of an outcrop, well section, or small segment of a basin comprise the subject of facies analysis. Several excellent texts deal extensively with facies analysis methods and process-response facies models, for example, the introductory texts by Walker and James (1992) and McLane (1995), and the more advanced treatments by Reading (1996) and Prothero and Schwab (1996). Therefore, little would be gained by presenting a complete discussion of facies models. Accordingly, this chapter focuses on a discussion of analytical methods and reviews the kinds of information that can be obtained from sediments based on the observations described in Chapter 2. It is hoped that this material will provide students with an introduction to modern facies-modeling methods. Practice on specific ancient examples can then be carried out with one of the advanced texts (mentioned above) in hand, and the final section of this chapter should serve to complement these by providing a discussion and an update of some of the most recent advances in our ideas.

Keywords

Debris Flow Sedimentary Structure Trace Fossil Facies Association Turbidity Current 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew D. Miall
    • 1
  1. 1.Geology DepartmentUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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