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The leopard

  • J. du P. Bothma
  • Clive Walker

Abstract

There is no large carnivore as elusive and shy as the leopard Panthera pardus. For many a traveller the only memory of seeing a leopard, beyond the initial shock of suddenly looking into two opalescent eyes, is an incomplete and fleeting optical image.

Keywords

Large Carnivore Prey Animal Wildlife Research Feeding Ecology South African Journal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. du P. Bothma
    • 1
  • Clive Walker
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Wildlife ManagementUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa
  2. 2.Lapalala WildernessVaalwaterSouth Africa

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