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Enzymatic Phosphorylation of Seed Globulins: Comparison between Pea and Soybean

  • D. Fouques
  • M.-C. Ralet
  • T. Chardot
  • J.-C. Meunier
Conference paper

Summary

Pea and soybean globulins were phosphorylated by a casein kinase II from Yarrowia lipolytica. Soybean 7S was the best substrate, followed by pea 7S, pea US and soybean US. Phosphate was incorporated into soybean 7S a and α’ subunits, pea 7S 47, 23 and 17 kDa polypeptides, and US acidic subunits.

Keywords

Casein Kinase Yarrowia Lipolytica Potential Phosphorylation Site Enzymatic Phosphorylation Acidic Subunit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Fouques
    • 1
  • M.-C. Ralet
    • 1
  • T. Chardot
    • 1
  • J.-C. Meunier
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Chimie Biologique, INRAINA-PG, Centre de Biotechnologie Agro-IndustrielleThiverval-GrignonFrance

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