Agent Software for Near-Term Success in Distributed Applications

  • S. C. Laufmann
Chapter

Abstract

The world is moving rapidly toward the deployment of geographically and organizationally diverse computing systems. Accordingly, the technical difficulties associated with distributed, heterogeneous computing applications are becoming increasingly apparent. Applications such as distributed information systems and electronic commerce are placing new demands on software infrastructures.

Keywords

Encapsulation Metaphor Glean Karen 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Laufmann
    • 1
  1. 1.U S West Advanced TechnologiesUSA

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