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Relationship Between Latent Infection and Groundnut Bacterial Wilt Resistance

  • B. S. Liao
  • Z. H. Shan
  • N. X. Duan
  • Y. J. Tan
  • Y. Lei
  • D. Li
  • V. K. Mehan
Chapter

Abstract

Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum E.F.Smith in groundnut or peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) has been an important constraint to groundnut production in China, Indonesia and Vietnam for decades and is becoming increasingly widespread in several other countries (Hayward 1990; Mehan et al. 1994; Mehan and Liao 1994; Liao et al. 1994; Hong et al. 1994). Although the disease was reported from several African countries in the 1930s and 1940s, it is not considered economically important there with the exception of Uganda (Mehan et al. 1994). In China, in recent years the infestated groundnut growing fields has increased to over 300,000 ha. The expansion of groundnut cultivation, use of susceptible cultivars in the new growing regions and less rotation are the reasons (Liao et al. 1995).

Keywords

Latent Infection Resistant Cultivar Bacterial Wilt Artificial Inoculation Wilt Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. S. Liao
  • Z. H. Shan
  • N. X. Duan
  • Y. J. Tan
  • Y. Lei
  • D. Li
  • V. K. Mehan

There are no affiliations available

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