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Impacts of Land Use on Biodiversity in Southwestern Australia

  • R. J. Hobbs
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 136)

Abstract

The ecosystems of southwestern Australia developed in isolation from other parts of Australia and the world, and this, together with an array of other factors has resulted in unique and diverse biotic assemblages and a high degree of floristic endemism (Hopper 1979, 1992). These have been subject to human modification for many thousands of years, following the colonization of the area by aboriginal peoples. Evidence is accumulating that these people had considerably more influence on Australian ecosystems than was previously thought, and their activities may have resulted in massive changes in vegetation and the extinction of megafauna (Flannery 1994; Kohen 1995).

Keywords

Fire Regime Remnant Vegetation Jarrah Forest Swan Coastal Plain Banksia Woodland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • R. J. Hobbs

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