Particle Adhesion and Removal on Wafer Surfaces in RCA Cleaning

  • Mitsushi Itano
  • Takehiko Kezuka
Chapter

Abstract

The fundamental interactions occurring between particles and the wafer surface in solutions are the van der Waals force (a molecular reciprocal action) and the electrostatic force (the reciprocal action of an electrical double layer). Research related to the particle adhesion mechanism on wafer surfaces in solutions that conform to the above two actions has thrived in recent years, and has done much to clarify the particle adhesion mechanism [1–12].

Keywords

Surfactant Peroxide Hydration Filtration Fluoride 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mitsushi Itano
    • 1
  • Takehiko Kezuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Daikin IndustriesJapan

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