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Traffic Safety as a Health Issue

  • Ricardo Martinez

Abstract

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), an agency of the United States Department of Transportation, was established approximately 30 years ago to reduce deaths, injuries and costs due to motor vehicle crashes. The first director of the National Highway Safety Bureau (predecessor to NHTSA) was Dr. William Haddon, a physician from the New York State Health Department. Over the years, NHTSA has employed a scientific, data-based approach to address the traffic and motor-vehicle safety problem. The approach employed is similar to the public health approach in (1) using data to identify the magnitude of the problem; (2) identifying the causes of the problem (what are the risk factors?); (3) developing and testing interventions/countermeas-ures to reduce the problem; and (4) implementing the interven-tions/countermeasures, monitoring and measuring their effectiveness in addressing the problem (Centers for Disease Control, 1994).

Keywords

Motor Vehicle Injury Prevention Traffic Safety Motor Vehicle Crash Injury Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ricardo Martinez
    • 1
  1. 1.National Highway Traffic Safety AdministrationUSA

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