The Yeasts: Sex and Nonsex. Life Cycles, Sporulation and Genetics

  • J. F. T. Spencer
  • D. M. Spencer
Chapter

Abstract

The vegetative life cycle of a yeast appears simple. The cell may produce a bud, the bud matures, separates from the mother cell, and produces its first bud. The mother cell continues to produce other buds. It is a simple way of life. However, a single yeast cell, if haploid, besides budding, can find a partner, fuse with it, produce a diploid cell, sporulate, and produce other yeast cells, with different arrangements of genes. Its life is not so simple.

Keywords

Fermentation Recombination Proline Caffeine Xylose 

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Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. T. Spencer
  • D. M. Spencer

There are no affiliations available

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