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Yeasts and the Life of Man: Part I: Helpers and Hinderers. “Traditional” Yeast-Based Industries; Spoilage Yeasts

  • J. F. T. Spencer
  • D. M. Spencer
Chapter

Abstract

Yeasts are newcomers to the economic life of man, and among his oldest associates. As newcomers, they are used as vehicles for production of heterologous proteins of many types. As old associates, yeasts have been used in the oldest of the yeast industries, baking, brewing, and winemaking, from the earliest days of recorded history. We must also consider the role of yeasts as spoilage agents. Yeasts have not always been a pure friend to mankind. They will raise bread, convert grapes and barley and other grains into beverages, and improve the flavor and nutritive value of his foodstuffs. They will also compete for his daily bread, should the “wrong” species of yeast invade it, and convert other foods into undesirable products which are inedible or toxic. They may invade human tissues with serious or fatal results (see Chap. 4).

Keywords

Yeast Species Yarrowia Lipolytica Wine Yeast Debaryomyces Hansenii Brewing Yeast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. T. Spencer
  • D. M. Spencer

There are no affiliations available

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