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Micropropagation of Duboisia Species

  • O. Luanratana
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 40)

Abstract

The genus Duboisia (family Solanaceae), containing only three species, is native to Australia. Each species is located in a distinct area: Duboisia hopwoodii F. Muell. in arid Central and Western Australia, D. leichhardtii F. Muell. in a very restricted area of southeast Queensland in semi-evergreen vine thickets (dry vine forests), and D. myoporoides R.Br. along the eastern coast from the south of Sydney to beyond Cairns in North Queensland is found in notophyll vine forests (Barnard 1952; Webb 1959; Griffin 1985; Pole 1993).

Keywords

Alkaloid Content Tropane Alkaloid Tissue Culture Technique Plant Growth Substance Major Alkaloid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. Luanratana
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of PharmacyMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand

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