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Micropropagation of Anthurium

  • T. K. Matsumoto
  • A. R. Kuehnle
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 40)

Abstract

Within the family Araceae, Anthurium is the largest, most morphologically diverse and complex genus, consisting of approximately 1000 species. Native to Central and South America, members of Anthurium are found at elevations ranging from sea level to 3000 m, most commonly in cloud forests at 1500m (Croat 1986). Plants of this herbaceaous perennial monocot are terrestrial or epiphytic. Typical of the aroids is the spadix, consisting of a multitude of unobtrusive true flowers supported by a fleshy axil. The protogynous nature of the bisexual flowers in Anthurium favors cross-pollination. The commercial flower is a combination of the spadix and a colorful modified leaf, termed spathe. Attractive foliage of some species makes anthuriums also suitable for leaf harvest and cultivation as a potted plant.

Keywords

Somatic Embryo Somatic Embryogenesis Bacterial Blight Lateral Shoot Multiple Shoot Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. K. Matsumoto
    • 1
  • A. R. Kuehnle
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureUniversity of Hawaii at ManoaHonoluluUSA

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