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Supercritical CO2 Extraction of the Essential Oils of Eucalypts: A Comparison with Other Methods

  • C. P. Milner
  • R. D. Trengove
  • C. M. Bignell
  • P. J. Dunlop
Part of the Modern Methods of Plant Analysis book series (MOLMETHPLANT, volume 19)

Abstract

The genus Eucalyptus (L’Heritier) is the most widely studied of all the Australian flora. Whilst Australia is the original source of nearly all eucalypts, Spain, Portugal, the Republic of South Africa, Swaziland, Chile and China all have substantial plantations that are used for the production of eucalyptus oil for export (Rothschild 1991).

Keywords

Supercritical Fluid Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Supercritical Fluid Extraction Steam Distillation Ginger Extract 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. P. Milner
  • R. D. Trengove
  • C. M. Bignell
  • P. J. Dunlop

There are no affiliations available

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