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Star Clusters and Associations

  • Hannu Karttunen
  • Pekka Kröger
  • Heikki Oja
  • Markku Poutanen
  • Karl Johan Donner

Abstract

Several collections of stars can be picked out in the sky, even with the naked eye. Closer study reveals that they really do form separate clusters in space. Such open star clusters are e.g. the Pleiades in Taurus and the Hyades around Aldebaran, the brightest star in Taurus. Almost the whole of the constellation Coma Berenices is also an open star cluster. Many objects appearing as nebulous patches to the unaided eye, when looked at with a telescope, turn out to be star clusters, like Praesepe in the constellation Cancer, or Misan, the double cluster in Perseus (Fig. 17.1). In addition to open clusters, some apparently nebulous objects are very dense globular clusters, such as those in Hercules and in Canes Venatici (Fig. 17.2).

Keywords

Open Cluster Globular Cluster Main Sequence Proper Motion Cluster Member 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Hanes, D., Madore, B. (eds.) (1980): Globular Clusters (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge).Google Scholar
  2. Spitzer, L. Jr. (1987): Dynamical Evolution of Globular Clusters (Princeton University Press, Princeton).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hannu Karttunen
    • 1
  • Pekka Kröger
    • 2
  • Heikki Oja
    • 3
  • Markku Poutanen
    • 4
  • Karl Johan Donner
    • 3
  1. 1.Tuorla ObservatoryUniversity of TurkuPiikköFinland
  2. 2.HelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.University of HelsinkiObservatoryFinland
  4. 4.Finnish Geodetic InstituteMasalaFinland

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