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Binary Stars and Stellar Masses

  • Hannu Karttunen
  • Pekka Kröger
  • Heikki Oja
  • Markku Poutanen
  • Karl Johan Donner

Abstract

Quite often, two stars may appear to be close together in the sky, although they are really at very different distances. Such chance pairs are called optical binary stars. However, many close pairs of stars really are at the same distance and form a physical system in which two stars are orbiting around each other. Less than half of all stars are single stars like the Sun. More than 50% belong to systems containing two or more members. In general, the multiple systems have a hierarchical structure: a star and a binary orbiting around each other in triple systems, two binaries orbiting around each other in quadruple systems. Thus most multiple systems can be described as binaries with several levels.

Keywords

Orbital Period Light Curve Proper Motion Binary Star Stellar Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Heinz, W. (1978): Double Stars (Reidel, Dordrecht).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Sahade, J., Wood, F. B. (1978): Interacting Binary Stars (Pergamon, Oxford).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hannu Karttunen
    • 1
  • Pekka Kröger
    • 2
  • Heikki Oja
    • 3
  • Markku Poutanen
    • 4
  • Karl Johan Donner
    • 3
  1. 1.Tuorla ObservatoryUniversity of TurkuPiikköFinland
  2. 2.HelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.University of HelsinkiObservatoryFinland
  4. 4.Finnish Geodetic InstituteMasalaFinland

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